Law Enforcement Grants

The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) is pleased to announce the availability of $6.4 million in state general funds to support the use of body-worn cameras in law enforcement.

The JAG program provides sub-grants to local governments and state agencies to support critical funding necessary in a wide range of program areas including law enforcement, prosecution and court, prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, planning and evaluation and technology improvements. For JAG competitive funds, DCJS will list the funding priorities in its published grant guidelines.

 

The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) is making federal Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding Grant (CESF) funds available to assist eligible applicants in preventing, preparing for, and responding to the coronavirus. The CESF Program is authorized by Division B of H.R. 748, Pub. L. No. 116- 136 (Emergency Appropriations for Coronavirus Health Response and Agency Operations) 28 U.S.C. 530C. This is a competitive solicitation. 

The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) is pleased to announce the availability of $1,500,000 in state general funds for localities to combat hate crimes.

The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) will provide education loan repayment benefits to prosecutors and public defenders in Virginia, using federal funds available through the John R. Justice (JRJ) Grant Program. The purpose of the program is to encourage qualified attorneys to choose careers as prosecutors and public defenders and continue in that service.

The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) is soliciting grant applications from nonprofit organizations to provide post-critical incident seminars and peer-supported critical incident stress management programs to law enforcement agencies and their staffs.

The Code of Virginia (§9.1-165, et seq.) provides for financial assistance to localities with police departments through the "599" program. Currently, 40 cities, 9 counties and 126 towns receive "599" funds. The Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) administers the program.

The Virginia Substantial Risk Order was initially introduced during the 2015 session of the Virginia General Assembly. The proposed legislation was updated several times since its initial introduction. These updates were influenced by lessons learned from other states, as well as input from a variety of stakeholders, including law enforcement, current and former commonwealth’s attorneys, the Office of the Executive Secretary, legislative legal staff, researchers, public health experts and treatment providers. The current Substantial Risk Order Law was introduced in the 2020 session of the Virginia General Assembly, where it was passed and signed into law. The law became effective on July 1, 2020. 

 

The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) is now accepting applications for the Virginia Gun Violence Intervention Program (GVIP).